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Category: Women x Slavery

AUDIO: Poet Lucille Clifton: ‘Everything Is Connected’

“One thing poetry teaches us,” Clifton once said, “is that everything is connected. There is so much history that we have not validated.” Clifton, an African-American poet who tackled the difficult subjects of injustice, racism, and sexism in her work, died Feb. 13 [2010] at the age of 73.

This March: Graduate Student Workshop with Tera Hunter at JHU

Please join the Sex and Slavery Lab, in conjunction with the 2017 Center for Africana Studies Symposium: Bound/UnBound: Contemporary Black Marriage in Research, Policy, and Practice, for a graduate student workshop with Dr. Tera Hunter, Professor in the Departments of History and African American Studies at Princeton University.

Palabras for Puerto Rico #PuertoRico

I am helping to host an online fundraiser via YouCaring for Festival de la Palabra, located in Loíza, Puerto Rico. Please help us reach our $5,000 goal: http://youcaring.com/PalabrasPR

The mission of Festival de la Palabra is to internationalize Puerto Rican literature through the promotion of reading and creative writing in Puerto Rico and the creation of meeting spaces between writers and readers at school, national and international levels. Since Hurricane Maria, organizers and volunteers from Festival de la Palabra (FDLP) have been engaged in relief activities supporting some of the most isolated communities and youth through the arts. FDLP’s projects are based in Loíza, Puerto Rico, a historically Afrxdescendiente area of the island.

In case you missed that part — These funds are going to support Black Diasporic Puerto Ricans. Yes, of course, this is the part of the island that is receiving the least amount of attention, the least amount of aid, and has the greatest need.

femmescapes

“We asked our contributors a central question: How do we understand our femininity in this changing world, where fascism is escalating every day? Death, by murder and suicide, is present in the work they sent us.”

Charles Theonia and Julieta Salgado, “Letter from the Editors,” @femmescapes, vol 2. (2017)

Cool #femDH #BlackCodeStudies

“If, therefore, in the cool, wild upsurges of animal vitality are tempered by metaphoric calm, such is the elegance of this symbolically phrased reconciliation that humor and ecstasy are not necessarily denied. Nor is physical beauty itself, a force which brings persons together via saturated expressions of sexual attractiveness and deliberately attractive behavior and charm, excluded from this moral vision. Being charming is also being cool, as suggested by the following interlude among black folk in Florida: ‘i “I wouldn’t let you fix me no breakfast. I get up and fix my own and then, what make it so cool, I’d fix you some and set it on the back of the cook-stove . . .” This man was flirting. But a whole ponderation lies concealed within his phrasing. He had cited the cool in an African sense, a diagram of continuity. He had promised to assume the role of another person in order to earn her love. He had promised to dissolve a difference which lay between them. The charm of what “made it so cool” in these senses suggests he knew, in Zen-like simplicity, the divine source of the power to heal, love. He had thereby identified the center from which all harmony comes.”

Slave Shout Songs from the Coast of Georgia: The McIntosh County Shouters #femDH #BlackCodeStudies

Smithsonian Folkways description: “The McIntosh County Shouters, 1993 recipients of the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, are known for their compelling fusion…

McIntosh County Shouters #femDH #BlackCodeStudies

The ringshout. Things discussed at #femDH:

“While the McIntosh County Shouters have been performing in public since 1980, they have been practicing the ring shout since the 18th century. This age-old tradition has been passed down from generation to generation in this family since their ancestors arrived in bondage over 300 years ago.”