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Tag: #blackwomanhood

AUDIO: Poet Lucille Clifton: ‘Everything Is Connected’

“One thing poetry teaches us,” Clifton once said, “is that everything is connected. There is so much history that we have not validated.” Clifton, an African-American poet who tackled the difficult subjects of injustice, racism, and sexism in her work, died Feb. 13 [2010] at the age of 73.

Black Womanhood: The Syllabus

I’m super excited to share a draft of the syllabus for Black Womanhood, the course I’m teaching with Martha Jones this spring! See below for the list of readings and feel free to tweet at us (@jmjafrx and @marthasjones_) if you decide to read alongside us. We would love to hear from you.

If you decide to adapt the syllabus in any way for yourself, keep in mind this blog is protected by a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. The details of the license are explained here.

If your use abides by those guidelines–Awesome! Then we ask that you please cite us on your syllabus materials, analog and digital, like so: “This syllabus was adapted from the syllabus “Black Womanhood,” designed by Jessica Marie Johnson and Martha S. Jones, first taught Spring 2018 at Johns Hopkins University.”

Black womanhood readings with bonus images after the jump. Enjoy.

My OAH Tribute: Stephanie M. H. Camp & Deborah Gray White

Below is the full-text of the talk I gave at the Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting last week. The panel was titled “Expanding the Boundaries: Power and Voice in African American Women’s and Gender History.” A separate reflection on the panel itself is incoming.

Stephanie Camp1
Stephanie M. H. Camp


My original remarks explored power and voice in histories of slavery and Afro-Atlantic women.

It quickly became a tribute to Deborah Gray White and the recently passed Stephanie M. H. Camp.

I edited the text below for the blog-as-media and easier reading. I used formatting to replicate speech patterns, added images and links where appropriate, and included sections I skipped last Friday for the sake of time. Overall, however, I stayed true to the text as shared that day.

You are welcome to reblog, cite, circulate at will. All I ask is you respect the terms of the Creative Commons license. If you reblog/reprint, reblog/reprint in its entirety and cite/link back to this blog as the original source (for more click here). And if you have questions or concerns about anything I wrote, email at will.

Thank you everyone for your warm remarks and feedback last weekend. Thank you blog visitor for reading.

And, of course, thank you Stephanie Camp for being an example to a young black woman trying to find her way in the academy, for your fearless scholarship and your brilliance. These words are dedicated to you. Rest in peace.

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