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Tag: digital black studies

Johnson & Neal’s Introduction to “Black Code Studies” – Wild Seed in the Machine (The Black Scholar, Vol 47, No. 3, 2017) #BlackCodeStudies

Johnson, Jessica Marie, and Mark Anthony Neal. “Introduction: Wild Seed in the Machine.” The Black Scholar 47, no. 3 (July 3, 2017): 1–2.

Black Code (co-edited by @jmjafrx and @NewBlackMan)

Delighted to share the latest special issue of the Black Scholar on the convergence of black studies and the digital humanities known as Black Code Studies–co-edited by Mark Anthony Neal and yours truly!

See below:

The Black Scholar is proud to announce the release of “Black Code,” a special issue of the Black Scholar. The guest editors, Jessica Marie Johnson and Mark Anthony Neal, have assembled a collective of digital soothsayers working on the margins of Black Studies, Afrofuturism, radical media, and the digital humanities. Black Code Studies is queer, femme, fugitive, and radical; as praxis and methodology, it waxes insurgent when the need arises. And in this moment, we are in need of Black digital insurgency, one attuned to racial scripts of the past even as it looks to future modes of Black thought and cultural production for inspiration. Barely scratching the surface, this issue welcomes new work and celebrates a Black digital fugitivity that has been present since the beginning of the internet. Our contributors include Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Lauren Cramer, Alessandra Raengo, Tara L. Conley, Ashleigh Wade, Aleia Brown, Joshua Crutchfield, Megan Driscoll, Ahmad Greene-Hayes, and Joy James, with an introduction from Jessica Marie Johnson and Mark Anthony Neal, and cover art from John Jennings celebrating Octavia Butler’s iconic novel Wild Seed.

Preview the introduction by Johnson and Neal, the co-editors, by following this link:
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rtbs20/47/3?nav=tocList

We hope you enjoy the work as much as we enjoyed bringing this phenomenal group of scholars together! Hurray! It’s here!!!

Cool #femDH #BlackCodeStudies

“If, therefore, in the cool, wild upsurges of animal vitality are tempered by metaphoric calm, such is the elegance of this symbolically phrased reconciliation that humor and ecstasy are not necessarily denied. Nor is physical beauty itself, a force which brings persons together via saturated expressions of sexual attractiveness and deliberately attractive behavior and charm, excluded from this moral vision. Being charming is also being cool, as suggested by the following interlude among black folk in Florida: ‘i “I wouldn’t let you fix me no breakfast. I get up and fix my own and then, what make it so cool, I’d fix you some and set it on the back of the cook-stove . . .” This man was flirting. But a whole ponderation lies concealed within his phrasing. He had cited the cool in an African sense, a diagram of continuity. He had promised to assume the role of another person in order to earn her love. He had promised to dissolve a difference which lay between them. The charm of what “made it so cool” in these senses suggests he knew, in Zen-like simplicity, the divine source of the power to heal, love. He had thereby identified the center from which all harmony comes.”

Slave Shout Songs from the Coast of Georgia: The McIntosh County Shouters #femDH #BlackCodeStudies

Smithsonian Folkways description: “The McIntosh County Shouters, 1993 recipients of the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, are known for their compelling fusion…