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Tag: queer

Black Womanhood: The Syllabus

I’m super excited to share a draft of the syllabus for Black Womanhood, the course I’m teaching with Martha Jones this spring! See below for the list of readings and feel free to tweet at us (@jmjafrx and @marthasjones_) if you decide to read alongside us. We would love to hear from you.

If you decide to adapt the syllabus in any way for yourself, keep in mind this blog is protected by a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. The details of the license are explained here.

If your use abides by those guidelines–Awesome! Then we ask that you please cite us on your syllabus materials, analog and digital, like so: “This syllabus was adapted from the syllabus “Black Womanhood,” designed by Jessica Marie Johnson and Martha S. Jones, first taught Spring 2018 at Johns Hopkins University.”

Black womanhood readings with bonus images after the jump. Enjoy.

femmescapes

“We asked our contributors a central question: How do we understand our femininity in this changing world, where fascism is escalating every day? Death, by murder and suicide, is present in the work they sent us.”

Charles Theonia and Julieta Salgado, “Letter from the Editors,” @femmescapes, vol 2. (2017)

Joseph on The Black Drag Queens Who Fought Before Stonewall at Outhistory

Outhistory is featuring original research by Channing Joseph on “drag” parties hosted in Washington, D.C.

“If Swann and his companions were alive today, they might proudly declare themselves to be gay or transgender. In doing so, they would receive support and validation for their desires and identities from LGBT people and allies in every sizable American city, including the nation’s capital. They would receive support from powerful organizations and people within the legal, political, medical and religious establishments.In 19th-century society, however, the organizers of Washington’s underground drag parties were known simply as deviant men, and it is quite likely that the only support and validation that they could hope for was from one another. These men were not only among the nation’s first drag queens. They were rebels whose sacrifices, courage and determination helped lay the foundations of self-acceptance, solidarity and community that made the Stonewall riots possible more than 80 years later.”

 

#Formation as Curated by Black Women

This archive is constantly being updated…keep checking back for more. For a selection of posts that center the voices of black women from New Orleans, see here: Doing and Being Intellectual History: #Formation as Curated by Black Women.

I wrote this on my Facebook wall on February 8th:

In case my politics of citation is unclear, I am sharing posts about ‪#‎Formation‬ written by black women, +1 for those written by black southern, NOLA/Louisiana women (the VSB post was the exception, but that was funny). You don’t have to agree or like Beyonce or the video, but you do need to listen when the kindred are speaking. This is theirs and they are ours and we are theirs and they’ve got something to SAY. If you fall in this category and I can share or boost, please send your link my way…

I’m compiling them here for archive purposes only. If you decide to use any of the material here–cite the author and link to the original post as much as possible. Give the author their due. If you decide to use them in a class, ASK permission of the original author first. Yes, even if your class is today. If you want to use this post as a bibliographic reference or reading list, you don’t need my permission but let me know (I’m curious who will use this) and do please link to the original post. Otherwise…read on…

In rough order of appearance on my TL (minus the VSB post):

Beyonce’s Formation is Her Best Thing Yet and it’s the IDGAF Anthem | Luvvie AjaYi at Awesomely Luvvie (2016)